Reviewing: The Muppets

1 Dec

As excited as I was to see this film, I was blown away by how much more I enjoyed it than I thought I would. Dear, dear Jason Segel. Your treatment of this film felt like a little love letter. “Thank you, Muppets, for enriching my childhood. If you will allow me, I will now pass it on  to enrich the childhoods of today.” Your appreciation for the puppeted pals translated into a refreshingly modern meta-version of the show and movies I loved growing up.

Yet, the beauty and simplicity of the original show and movies remains intact throughout this film. AND the film manages to successfully comment on today’s youth.

I saw this film with my nine year old brother. Every step of the way, our feelings matched. He felt humor and sadness when I did, even if for completely different reasons. It is hard for a film to connect across age gaps in the way that this film does. It is the definition of heartwarming.

By the way, America. Can we PLEASE dethrone our so-called America’s Sweethearts and make way for Amy Adams!? Because of her performance in this film and this one.

Advertisements

Anticipating: Muppets

1 Dec

YAY! Nostalgia overwhelming me, over here.

I grew up watching taped episodes of The Muppet television show. Every Christmas growing up, I would sit with my siblings and view my favorite version of Dicken’s A Christmas Carol. Needless to say, this movie is one I am excited to see!

Reviewing: Anonymous

1 Dec

Roland Emmerich does Shakespeare! And then destroys him.

The movie pretty much opens with The Globe burning down for a reason other than it caught fire in an accident  during a performance of Henry VIII.  Right off the gate, he had to give a big middle finger to the audience. It’s as if he is saying, “American audiences are so dumb. They’ll never know.”

I have heard a lot of silly theories about Shakespeare not being the author of his plays. But THIS theory. It is the most ridiculous one I have ever heard. THE MOST RIDICULOUS. Not only is the theory ludicrous, but the facts are, in most cases, indisputably inaccurate. The plays are presented out of order and simple known facts are changed to fit the story.

Emmerich could have touted this as a fictional account of Shakespeare’s life. However, he tried to pass it off as a viable, realistic theory. In doing that, he committed a sin against film and Shakespeare.

The truth is: American film-viewers can be dumb. They tend to take things at face value and don’t question what they are seeing. This is why Emmerich’s films, while nonsensical and insulting, make bookoos of money. His movies are mindless and that is often what movie-goers want. I have no problem with his disregard for reality in order to make an entertaining film. However, when he tries to tell a historical drama and misconstrues basic facts, it becomes insulting. People will watch this movie in the future and think it happened. You know they will!

DO NOT GIVE THIS FILM OR EMMERICH ANY MONEY. If you have to see it, find a way without supporting this appraisal of unintelligence.

SPOILERS (so you don’t have to see it!)

In this film, Emmerich presents us with his vision of Shakespeare’s life. Shakespeare is a murderer, bum, and fraud. The real author of Shakespeare’s work is a child prodigy. Queen Elizabeth is an incestuous harlot.

Yeah.

Anticipating: Anonymous

1 Dec

 

NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO. JUST NO.

Reviewing: The Help

1 Dec

Or “Why I Hate Chick Flicks.”

 

Dear Hollywood,

Women are not the idiots you seem to think they are. You do not need to dumb things down. The incessant film-making reminders on how the audience is supposed to feel (crescendoing  music, quick cuts, slow panning!) were insulting.

Women are also fully capable of figuring out the plot without being constantly reminded. They are women, not Alzheimer’s patients.

Women are not all either man-hating, independent, working girls or vapid, obedient caregivers. Why do you insist on making chick flicks so black and white? And don’t try and tell me she was somehow different. She wasn’t.

Women are not all emotional, tear-filled sponges searching upon every film-going experience to be squeezed. You can keep your huge heartfelt and cheesy scenes to yourself. It not only weakens your audience but your film.

I would go on, but I am sure I will have more opportunities to rant soon.

Sincerely,

Fed Up With The Bias

Anticipating: The Help

13 Oct

I have discovered a strange love for Emma Stone, although not as much as some people have. She is an actress who should get on my nerves due to her over-the-top performances. Yet, she has repeatedly brought charm to the screen with her humor, sexiness, and maturity. (Easy A was one of the biggest surprises in film in 2010. I expected the film to be merely tolerable and to be stolen by the  amazing  ensemble  cast. However, Stone was not only able to hold onto her leading role, but she established herself as being able to contend with serious actors.) The girl seems to make good choices, so I am confident in the possibility of this film being enjoyable.

The trailer is delightful. The story seems stronger in this film than in most other films geared toward women. Stone plays an independent career woman who seems like a fresh departure from the so-called independent career women from other female films. For me, most “chick fliks” lack the effort put into mainstream fare. It’s as if to say women are not deserving of the effort, or they are so unintelligent that they won’t notice. The talented cast should be able to give the film the care and effort it deserves, hopefully saving it.

To read a great review about the novel, check out semesterofhades.

Reviewing: Drive

12 Oct

I had a feeling that this film would be cheesy; however, I never thought I’d be in for an ’80s throwback!

The film opens with the title in large, pink, cursive scrawl plastered up on the screen and set to a synth-heavy pop track. The ’80s tone continues throughout the film from the wardrobe to the use of split screen. It is a refreshing take on a genre that seems to be losing steam.

As every critic seems to be saying, Ryan Gosling is fantastic in this. It was almost too difficult for me to watch sections of this film at times due to how good and believable he is. However, his performance would not be the same were it not for the beautiful and understated Carey Mulligan. She brings the heart, a large part of what separates this film from the rest in the genre.

I highly recommend this movie. I will be buying it on DVD but not at full price.